diybiosingapore

CONSUMER GENOMICS, CITIZEN SCIENCE AND DIYBIO MOVEMENTS

In DIYbio on February 13, 2011 at 11:33 am

Special panel at the Genomics Institute in association with the two day international workshop on

“Asian Biopoleis: Biotechnology & Biomedicine as Emergent Forms of Life and Practice”

6‐8 JANUARY 2011

organised by Asia Research Institute & National University of Singapore

http://www.ari.nus.edu.sg/events_categorydetails.asp?categoryid=6&eventid=1093

SESSION 6: CONSUMER GENOMICS, CITIZEN SCIENCE AND DIYBIO MOVEMENTS

Chairperson Ryan BISHOP

10:00 Sandra Soo‐Jin LEE
Center for Biomedical Ethics,
Stanford University
Race, Risk and Recreation in Personal Genomics

10:25 Takashi KIDO
Riken Genesis. Co., Ltd.
Genetics and Artificial Intelligence for
Personal Genome Services

11:15 Denisa KERA
Communications and New Media Programme,
National University of Singapore
From DIYGenomics to DIYBio: Emerging Citizen
Science Incubators and Projects in Southeast Asia

Communities of people monitoring, sharing and making sense of various “objective” and “scientific” data in their
everyday life are exploring new and unexpected global networks around lowtech biotechnologies and biomedicine. As similar communities evolve globally there have been shifts in scientific knowledge bases and increased permeability to the boundaries of scientific knowledge. Movements such as Consumer Genomics, Citizen Science and DIYbio have the potential to radically transform and redefine the conduct and practice to scientific work in Singapore and Asia. Key questions that will be addressed through this panel include:
What is the state of the art in citizen science projects, consumer genomics services and various DIYbio initiatives?
What challenges do these consumer and publicly oriented services pose to the official biotech industry?
How these services operate on the global level and what type of exchanges are we witnessing between continents
and cultures?
Does challenging research happen only in professional labs or we are starting to witness an emergence of new
models of more communitybased research that will involve the public in the whole process?
What perspectives do these movements offer to the developing world?

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